Music Reviews

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Artist: Angelina Yershova
Title: Resonance Night
Format: CD + Download
Label: Twin Paradox Records
The core of “Resonance Night” is an instrumental piano album, around which is built a very high-end electronica production full of sharp digital noises and sampled breathing. There’s a strong emphasis on melodic leads, often sparse rather than lyrical, some catchy, some improvised. The net result is somewhere between Planet Mu, Leaf, Chilly Gonzales, Brandt Brauer Frick and the rich contemporary vein of experimental soundscapes.

Though the press release cites “piano drones”, I don’t wholly agree. Rhythm is a frequent presence here, and there’s often a steady and assured drive and pattern, whether it comes from the piano itself in pieces like “Resonance Train” and its partner piece “Resonance Night”, or from the heavy drum programming on “Sweet Glissando”. Atmosphere-led pieces like “Intermezzo 80 Hertz” are in the minority.

“Melancholy Modulation” encapsulates the album’s common tone nicely, opening with clipped stabs of the piano’s lower register before transitioning halfway through into romantic chords and calmness, before boom! The following track, the standout “Anarchic Piano” kicks in, more bass piano stabs, rumbling kick drums, percussive effects, and complex chord stabs. It’s an album full of energy and variety and it’s not afraid to wander between emotional territories.

There’s a strong and obvious sense of travel, most expertly played out in “Start Of Journey” (the final track!) where the heavily processed rhythmic bed, that may itself have evolved from a piano, is strongly evocative of rolling wheels, while interim piano notes are akin to passing scenery. It’s not a unique idea but it is expressed in a warm and mesmerising fashion.

When I was sent this release, I’ll be honest, I first approached it cynically. The mainstream classical music industry seems to thrive on young, attractive-looking new performers for their marketability, sometimes slightly regardless of their abilities; was such a base commercial effect in danger of drifting into more avantgarde classical territory as well? Well don’t worry, once I’d listened to the album I slapped myself hard on the wrist and chastised myself for being so cynical. While there is certainly a slight degree of ego here- few artists in this field put photos of their faces on their covers- this is absolutely NOT a case of style over content.

Check out ChainDLK’s interview with Angelina Yershova from last week for more info about the artist’s personal history and thoughts on the work.



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